Programs

Programs (16)

Thursday, 23 February 2017 15:32

High School Internships

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High school students can take advantage of internship opportunities through the Environmental Literacy and Outdoor Education program.

Education interns work with the kindergarten program at Camp Woodlands or the fourth grade program at Arlington Echo, teaching students through outdoor experiential learning.

Research interns undertake research projects at Arlington Echo. Current topics include SAV research, phytoplankton monitoring, establishing a database for water quality measurements, and mapping rare and threatened native plants at Arlington Echo and Camp Woodlands. Interns develop authentic research questions and collect data to test a hypothesis based on their question.

Environmental horticulture interns assist Arlington Echo staff with environmental horticultural processes such as removing invasive species from natural areas, designing and maintaining native garden habitats for butterflies, humming birds and other organisms, worm and kitchen composting, natural fertilization, mulching, pruning, growing submerged aquatic vegetation, caring for Atlantic White Cedars and maintaining the cold frame.

Chesapeake Connections interns support classroom outreach and field projects that lead to environmental stewardship. Topics include aquatic grasses, American eels, terrapins, storm water restoration projects, and monarch butterfly gardens. Interns assist with all aspects of the project, including classroom outreach, maintenance of plants and animals used in the projects, and the end of year projects that involve plantings and the release of eels and terrapins.

Contact Arlington Echo 410-222-3822

Thursday, 23 February 2017 15:26

Envirothon

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The Envirothon is a statewide competition for high school students. Students study topics such as aquatics, forestry, soils and wildlife and participate annually in an outdoor competition. Envirothon teams are made up of five students who work together to study Maryland’s natural resources over the course of the school year. All topics are hands-on and include practical skills. Training is conducted by experts in each field. Students train in the fall and spring with resource professionals in four content areas and one topic that changes annually. County competitions typically occur in April, and the county winners compete at the state level in June. The Arlington Echo site is used for training and competitions. Our staff also provide instructional support to teachers and students.

Contact Arlington Echo 410-222-3822

Thursday, 23 February 2017 15:17

Native Growers

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The Native Growers program is a partnership with the Office of Special Education. High school Alternate Curriculum Class (ACC) students develop horticulture skills while learning about the importance of native plants and their relationships to native animals. Students grow milkweed to support Monarch caterpillars, nectar plants to support pollinators, submerged aquatic vegetation (SAVs) to plant in rivers to protect the shoreline and provide habitat for marine species, and trees to be planted in restoration projects. Students propagate plants by seed, root division, and cuttings. Students learn how to water, identify and treat plant pesst using integrated pest management (IPM), transplant plants and compost. The plants produced by this program support our Chesapeake Connections restoration projects throughout the county.

Contact Sheen Goldberg swgoldberg@aacps.org

Arlington Echo 410-222-3822

Thursday, 23 February 2017 14:57

Arlington Echo Grade 4

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Every AACPS fourth grade class visits Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville, MD, for a one-day or overnight field experience as part of their environmental literacy learning. Arlington Echo programs are linked to the science curriculum throughout the school year. Through exciting, hands-on activities, students investigate the human impact on climate, land, water and living things in the Chesapeake Bay in its watershed. They are challenged to put environmental ideals into action.

Students travel to different learning stations on site, gathering information to develop an educated and environmentally responsible answer to an overarching question: How can we help the Chesapeake Bay? Activities include marsh exploration, canoeing, seining, stormwater investigation and more.

Supervision and instruction are provided by Arlington Echo staff and volunteers recruited by classroom teachers. All volunteers undergo background checks.

Meals are provided in the dining hall. We challenge students to be “Waste Watchers,” who minimize their food waste by following the philosophy "Take what you like; Eat what you take" and by participating in our on-site composting program. Students aim for a "Zero Waste" meal.

Climate controlled cabins with bunk beds and bathroom facilities provide overnight accommodations. Arlington Echo is a 24-acre outdoor education site owned by AACPS. It includes forest, stream and wetland habitats and is located on the Severn River.

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Tuesday, 06 December 2011 13:47

Monarch Butterflies

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monarch-butterfly largeIn conjunction with the Environmental Literacy initiative, Arlington Echo introduces its newest unit on the Monarch Butterfly. The unit, How Can We Help Monarch Butterflies? has been developed as part of the first grade curriculum. The Monarch unit began in fall of 2011 for first grade classrooms around Anne Arundel County, MD. Arlington Echo plans to roll out the program to the rest of the first grade classes over the next few years. By the spring of 2015 the program will have been implemented in 81 schools, 300 classrooms and had over 20,000 students participate in it.

Why the Monarch Butterfly?

The Monarch butterfly was chosen to be the focus of our first grade Environmental Literacy unit for a variety of reasons. One being that “Human impact” plays a significant role in Environmental Literacy.  In the case of the Monarch, human impact has greatly affected the species to the very mention of extinction.  To lose a species like the Monarch would be a tragic loss.  We feel it is our duty to educate and inform about the issues surrounding the Monarch butterfly, so that conservation efforts can be made to help secure their future.

Facts:

  • The worst year on record was 2013, with the Monarch population at 80% below average
  • Top threats include: Pesticide/herbicide use, weather related events, mowing of natural areas, deforestation, and development
  • The largest population of Monarchs can be found throughout the United States of America, Canada and Mexico
  • The lifecycle of the Monarch has four stages- Egg, Larva(Caterpillar), Pupa(Chrysalis), Adult (Butterfly)
  • Monarch caterpillars have 5 instars (stages)
  • There are 3-4 (Occasionally 5) generations in a single year
  • The Monarch caterpillar eats ONLY the leaves of milkweed plants
  • Monarch migration behavior still contains many mystery’s
  • 95% of the population migrates to Mexico, the other 5% to California
  • During migration, Monarchs can travel between 1,000-3,000 miles

 

Wednesday, 28 July 2010 15:31

Chesapeake Stewards

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In the spring of 2009, we began to implement the Chesapeake Stewards initiative at Arlington Echo. The purpose is to inform students and parent volunteers about how their actions affect the Chesapeake Bay and to motivate them to take Bay-friendly actions when they return home.
Friday, 30 January 2009 06:58

Watershed Stewards Academy

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AACPS and the Anne Arundel Department of Public Works (AADPW) collaborated to create the AA County Watershed Stewards Academy (WSA), a unique community outreach and environmental action program. Watershed Stewards Academy builds capacity in Anne Arundel County by training Master Watershed Stewards to help neighbors reduce pollution in our local creeks and rivers. The certification course gives Stewards the tools to implement change in their communities, turning knowledge into action. Stewards work with their communities to install projects such as rain gardens or conservation landscapes and to reduce pollution at its source. Collectively, these small community-based actions are improving the health of the larger Chesapeake Bay watershed. Since 2009, WSA has certified over 160 Master Watershed Stewards from Brooklyn Park to Herring Bay. Each year, these Stewards collaborate with neighbors, businesses, schools and each other to install hundreds of projects that reduce pollution in our rivers and streams.

Watershed Stewards Academy

Saturday, 01 March 2008 03:29

Initiative & Confidence Course

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The Initiative and Confidence course at Arlington Echo Out is designed for students and adults to build communication and cooperation skills. Through a series of field games and low elements, participants work as a team to solve problems and overcome challenges. These team building activities help participants become more self-confident as individuals and more collaborative as members of a team. Completing these activities is also a great way for participants to build trust. This course works well with students at the beginning of the school year, faculty groups, clubs and sports teams. All groups must be led by a certified instructor. Certification requires a two-day, 16-hour workshop, which is offered at Arlington Echo three times a year.

 

Initiative and Confidence Certification

This two-day, 16-hour workshop provides the certification required to use the Initiative and Confidence Course at the Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center. AACPS personnel sign up on ERO. Non-AACPS personnel contact the Environmental Literacy and Outdoor Education Office 410-222-3822.

 

Initiative and Confidence Recertification

Recertification is required every two years. AACPS personnel sign up on ERO for this half day workshop. Non-AACPS personnel contact the Environmental Literacy and Outdoor Education Office 410-222-3822.

 

Contact Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center 410-222-3822

Wednesday, 27 February 2008 10:10

Programs

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Through the AACPS Environmental Literacy and Outdoor Education programs, students participate in authentic, interdisciplinary, hands-on, environmental and outdoor learning. Our programs enhance, extend and enrich classroom curriculum. Students connect with their local environment, investigate the impact of their actions on our planet, and learn to make and act upon responsible environmental decisions. Students also prepare for college, career and civic life while they build environmental literacy. Our programs also reach teachers and community members.

Arlington Echo Grade 4

Camp Woodlands Kindergarten

Drownproofing Grade 5

Chesapeake Connections Grade 6

Native Growers

Initiative & Confidence Course

Terrapin Connection

Envirothon

High School Internships

Watershed Stewards Academy

Monday, 18 February 2008 08:55

Drownproofing Grade 5

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The Drownproofing Program is a comprehensive aquatic safety program for fifth grade students in Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Students learn personal water safety skills through classroom and pool instruction. At school, water safety readiness lessons are taught by classroom teachers; these lessons are aligned with the Language Arts curriculum. Students are then transported to one of two pools used for the program. The Arundel Olympic Swim Center in Annapolis is used throughout the school year. The pool at Arlington Echo is used in September, May and June. Each student receives four hours of instruction in the pool by certified aquatic safety instructors. Lessons focus on personal water safety, use of personal flotation devices (PFDs), safe rescues of others, cold water survival techniques, hypothermia and ice safety. Instructors complete a skills evaluation for each student. Classroom teachers recruit parent volunteers to assist with supervision. All volunteers undergo background checks.

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